Musings from the Manhut

Where the ebb and flow of life creates a cascade of words down the paper's face

Tag: davycrockett

Earthquake during a bear hunt from the Life of David Crockett

We prepared for resting that night, and I can assure the reader I was in need of it. We had laid down by our fire, and about ten o’clock there came a most terrible earthquake, which shook the earth so, that we were rocked about like we had been in a cradle. We were very much alarmed; for though we were accustomed to feel earthquakes, we were now right in the region which had been torn to pieces by them in 1812, and we thought it might take a notion and swallow us up, like the big fish did Jonah.

<em>I wish that Crockett had given a better descrption of where this was. It would be interesting to see the historical record of this quake.</em>

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Quote from A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett, of the State of Tennessee.

…he had then feather’d in on the big tree, to cut that, and had found that it was nothing but a shell on the outside, and all doted in the middle, as too many of our big men are in these days, having only an outside appearance.

Quote from A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett, of the State of Tennessee.

I turned aside to hunt, and had not gone far when I found a deer that had just been killed and skinned, and his flesh was still warm and smoking. From this I was sure that the Indian who had killed it had been gone only a very few minutes; and though I was never much in favour of one hunter stealing from another, yet meat was so scarce in camp, that I thought I must go in for it. So I just took up the deer on my horse before me, and carried it on till night. I could have sold it for almost any price I would have asked; but this wasn’t my rule, neither in peace nor war. Whenever I had any thing, and saw a fellow being suffering, I was more anxious to relieve him than to benefit myself. And this is one of the true secrets of my being a poor man to this day. But it is my way; and while it has often left me with an empty purse, which is as near the devil as any thing else I have seen, yet it has never left my heart empty of consolations which money couldn’t buy,—the consolations of having sometimes fed the hungry and covered the naked.

Quote from A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett, of the State of Tennessee.

The next day the major got in, and brought a worse tale than I had, though he stated the same facts, so far as I went. This seemed to put our colonel all in a fidget; and it convinced me, clearly, of one of the hateful ways of the world. When I made my report, it wasn’t believed, because I was no officer; I was no great man, but just a poor soldier. But when the same thing was reported by Major Gibson!! why, then, it was all as true as preaching, and the colonel believed it every word.

Quote from A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett, of the State of Tennessee.

We worked on for some years, renting ground, and paying high rent, until I found it wan’t the thing it was cracked up to be; and that I couldn’t make a fortune at it just at all. So I concluded to quit it, and cut out for some new country. In this time we had two sons, and I found I was better at increasing my family than my fortune. It was therefore the more necessary that I should hunt some better place to get along; and as I knowed I would have to move at some time, I thought it was better to do it before my family got too large, that I might have less to carry.

Quote from A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett, of the State of Tennessee.

We passed the time quite merrily, until the company broke up; and having gotten my wife, I thought I was completely made up, and needed nothing more in the whole world. But I soon found this was all a mistake—for now having a wife, I wanted every thing else; and, worse than all, I had nothing to give for it.

Quote from A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett, of the State of Tennessee.

At our next meeting we set the day for our wedding; and I went to my father’s, and made arrangements for an infair, and returned to ask her parents for her. When I got there, the old lady appeared to be mighty wrathy; and when I broached the subject, she looked at me as savage as a meat axe.

Quote from A Narrative of the Life of David Crockett, of the State of Tennessee.

She had been travelling all day, and was mighty tired; and I would have taken her up, and toated her, if it hadn’t been that I wanted her just where I could see her all the time, for I thought she looked sweeter than sugar; and by this time I loved her almost well enough to eat her.

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